Health & Well-Being

Heartbreak

Should someone who's cheated be forgiven? TipToenNMaJrdns weighs in

I thought he was the love of my life. He made me feel special in a way no one else ever has. I trusted him. I trusted him enough to give him a part of me that nobody else could possess. I swore I loved him.

I remember the day like it was yesterday. I was at the lake when I got the text from his friend. “He cheated on you.” I don’t think I’ve ever broken down so quickly in my life. I felt a mix of anger and sadness and hurt. Why was I not good enough for him? What did I do to make him do this? I couldn’t believe what happened.

I stared at the text for over 10 minutes. My friends tried to comfort me but nothing they said or did could change the fact that he cheated on me. I called my mom and told her to take me home, making every attempt to keep it together, but I broke down in the car. As soon as I got home I got into the shower and turned to self harm. Later that night, I shut down completely. I felt numb.

It’s now August, and I can say I’ve made it. It no longer feels like a stab in the chest when I see his name. I can hear the song we always used to sing together and not break down. What I needed was to let time heal the wound; I kept myself distracted, I hung around people I was comfortable with, and with time, I got over him. I haven’t felt the need to harm myself since. It’s not the answer even though it felt like it at the time.

And, for the record, if anybody who cheated on you tries to get with you again, don’t go back. No matter how much you love them. In my opinion, nobody deserves to be put second when it comes to relationships, and nobody deserves to be cheated on. It’s the lowest thing anybody can do.

You deserve so much better than someone who thinks it’s alright to cheat. Keep your head up, you will make it. I did.

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