Health & Well-Being

Strength in the face of the inevitable

TipToenNMaJrdns talks about why change is hard, and how it's manageable

Almost everybody goes through a big change in their lives; whether it’s moving to a completely new city/province/country, a loss, or simply switching schools.

I think the biggest change I've ever gone through is moving away from my mom into a new country to California with my dad, surrounded by not only a whole new family, but new cultures, religions, people, morals and schools. It hasn’t been easy to adjust, and carrying around depression and anxiety on my back didn't make adjusting any easier. I made some really good friends pretty fast, though. I would say that my social life was really stable and healthy, but my family life was not exactly "ideal."

I didn't get along with my step mom at all, which was expected considering her husband’s daughter from another woman came into her life pretty abruptly. At that time I couldn't drive, so I was really isolated because they lived in a remote community. I did learn some really good skills about keeping a house clean and being able to take care of myself though.

The effect that living away from my mom has had on me wasn't easy to handle at first. I became really isolated and introverted, I felt lonely, sad, almost defeated. As time went on, I went to school, my perspective started improving. I really liked California; the cultural differences it has in comparison to Canada, the people, the language spoken, and in general the scenery. I began to appreciate the decision I made.

It’s almost guaranteed that big changes will have a negative effect on you, even if that big change is something awesome like winning the lottery! My doctor said that as someone who deals with depression, any major change will cause a low swing. As long as you push through, you can get through and eventually feel comfortable with the change.

Have you ever gone through a big change? How did you handle it?

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